I reread "What Goes Into an Award-Winning Essay" after almost forgetting about the major takeaways "What Goes" lists: key moment; time to process; layers of narration; new knowledge; and narrative control. Upon revisiting this important and informative piece, I am drawn back to the "principle" of maintaining "absolute narrative control" when drafting my own written work.

There are lots of writers writing about writing advice. Just recently I read a separate article suggesting, which to my interpretation found, one need not the authorial self-control that "What Goes" suggests a writer practice. Authorial self-control and, to a certain extent, self-awareness are a balancing act as a draft emerges: And readers can sense when that balance is achieved. Don't be taken up by cheap writing advice. Write down only what is required for the writing to reveal itself into existence.

--

--